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Posted: Jun 14, 2019

Out of My Mind: They Don’t Know What They Don’t Know

By Rich Marinucci

During some recent discussions about the fire service, the question of how much policy makers and the general public really know about today’s fire service was discussed. There seems to be a disconnect, yet in some cases, that works in the fire service’s favor. It has generated great support for maintaining the status quo and also is helpful when requesting additional funding through ballot proposals. In many cases, this is reflected in the huge support received for votes to address fire department issues. But, these situations don’t always get to the grass roots supporters as others weigh in on the need for increases and minimum standards that should be met. This would be based on the belief that the vast majority of those who control the fire service resources and the folks who call for service don’t know what good service or bad service is. They are just happy that someone responds. As such, they give really good marks when asked about their local department. Since they believe they are getting a level of service that meets their perceived needs, they are reluctant to increase spending to improve the operation. So, under-resourced organizations—whether personnel, training, apparatus, or equipment—have a difficult time getting increases because they either don’t get a chance to ask their end users, or when they do, they are asked “why” if they already think they have great service. Certainly, a double-edged sword.

This discussion leads into the concept that people don’t know what they don’t know until they know it!! That sure sounds confusing as I write it. But what is means is that if you don’t have a benchmark, you really can’t tell how you are doing. It is all based on your frame of reference, and if this is small, you can’t compare to “state-of-the-art” performance. I have seen this in understaffed departments that talk about how they are “able to put out a lot of fire” with their one- or two-person companies. I hear it from on-call departments that have lengthy response times on occasion or very limited personnel at certain times of the day. I also hear it from some bigger departments that seem to think that they can continue as they always have without updating their procedures, training, and general approach. I wonder what would happen if we had a legitimate way to measure competence. I know there are measures in use now, but I don’t think they address actual performance. We do get a chance to evaluate ourselves when we get a video of our work. When you do, how many times do you find that you could have done better, be it with better staffing, quality training, sets and reps, or the appropriate equipment? In our line of work, we must continue to strive to get to perfection even if that ultimate goal is not attainable. Continuous improvement must be the objective.

On occasion, I hear of an issue that I really hadn’t considered or given much thought. Recently I received a call from a member of the fire service asking me if I had heard much about people driving over fire hose and causing damage. I admit I haven’t thought about it too much. But, I was told that there are places where this happens too frequently and not only damages equipment but could put firefighters in danger if they lose their water supply. I do remember carrying equipment to bridge the hose if someone really needed to drive through a fire scene. I don’t remember ever deploying the tool. But considering how much the general public is in a hurry and inconsiderate of others’ emergencies, it doesn’t surprise me that people would not be patient and either wait or find another route. In the overall scope of things, this may not seem like a huge issue but if it ha

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Posted: Jun 14, 2019

New Fire Station Honoring Charleston 9 to Open In December

Crews started work on the new Station 11 for the Charleston (SC) Fire Department in August 2018. It should be ready to open in December 2019.

The station is intended to honor the nine firefighters, known as the Charleston 9, who died in the Sofa Super Store fire. The site of the station overlooks the Sofa Super Store fire.


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Posted: Jun 14, 2019

New Fire Station Honoring Charleston 9 Scheduled To Open In December

Crews started work on the new Station 11 for teh Charleston (SC) Fire Department in August 2018. It should be ready to open in December 2019. The station is intended to honor the nine firefighters, known as the Charleston 9, who died in the Sofa Super Store fire. The site of the station overlooks the Sofa Super Store fire. The new station will accommodate two companies, a command traning center, and a spare fire apparatus.  
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Posted: Jun 14, 2019

Video: Black Forest (CO) SVI Rescue-Pumper


When specing its new rescue-pumper, Black Forest, CO Fire Rescue chose a 12′ aluminum SVI-body mounted on a 10″ raised roof Spartan Metro Star chassis, which houses a powerful 450-hp Cummins L9 engine. This pump-and-roll rescue-pumper comes with a Command Light Knight 2 series light tower, PumpBoss series pressure governor, 750-gallon polypropylene water tank, FoamPro 1600 foam system, and much more. 

For more information, visit https://www.svitrucks.com/portfolio-items/black-forest-rescue-pumper-1078/?portfolioCats=20

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Posted: Jun 14, 2019

Video: Pierce Quantum® Pumper - Okolona (KY) Fire Department


The Okolona (KY) Quantum cab features an interior/exterior accessible EMS compartment that spans the entire width of the truck. To make the hoses easier to deploy and for cleanliness, the pump panel is enclosed. The entire interior of the pumper body is coated in Line-X for increased durability. The rear incorporates thru-tank ladder storage and an air suspension dump. When activated, the rear of the truck drops 4.5” to make it easier to access the tailboard and rear ladder.  

CHASSIS 

  • Chassis: 74” Quantum® cab with 12” raised roof 
  • Seating capacity: 5 
  • Overall height: 10’ 3” 
  • Overall length: 35’ 11.75” 
  • GVW rating: 49,800 lb 
  • Safety: Side Roll and Frontal Impact Protection 
  • Front axle: Meritor MFS-20, 22,800 lb 
  • Rear axle: Meritor RS26-185, 27,000 lb 
  • Engine: Detroit Diesel DD13, 505 hp, 1,750 torque 
  • Electrical system: Command Zone™ advanced electronics system 

BODY 

  • Material: Aluminum 
  • Shelving: Adjustable, up to 500 lb 
  • Doors: AMDOR roll-up 
  • Pump: Waterous, 1,500-gpm 
  • Tank: 500 gallons 
  • Pump panel: Control Zone™, 48” pump panel 
  • Foam system: Husky™ 12 
  • Foam cell: 30 gallons 
  • Generator: Harrison 6kW, hydraulic 

Job No: 32676 

Dealership: Finley Fire Equipment

For more information, visit www.piercemfg.com.

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