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Mission Statement

The objectives of this Division shall be to further enhance the education of all Fire Service Administrative Support by conducting workshops and seminars; to increase the proficiency of Fire Administrative Support by establishing a network sharing of information systems through various channels of communication; and to faciliate a statewide standardization wherever possible in all phases and aspects of the Fire Administrative Support field for the benefit of the Fire Service.

Recent Fire Administrative Support News

Posted: May 1, 2019
Categories: Fire Mechanics
Comments: 0
 
Thermal Imaging | Manfred Kihn
 

I love asking firefighters if they use their thermal imaging cameras (TICs) on every call and seeing their reactions!

Carl Nix

I recently had an opportunity to meet with a deputy chief, a chief training officer, and a training officer and asked them if their firefighters use TICs on every call. All three looked at each other and said, “NO!” I asked them if their TICs were used for size-up, and again I received a “NO!” I asked, how about when making initial entry for suppression and victim search and rescue? You guessed it! “NO!” I finally just asked, when did they use their TICs? The answer? “For overhaul!”

To summarize, this extremely valuable technology tool is just sitting in the apparatus while the firefighters are doing all the hard work! I’m thinking that this technology is being underutilized. What are you thinking?

Here’s a recent example. I was at a fire station when crews were called out. They arrived on scene within a few minutes, and after about five minutes the officer called on the radio for someone to bring the TIC off the engine. With technology in thermal imaging evolving so rapidly, TICs have dropped from approximately 6.5 pounds to 1.5 pounds and have come down in price considerably. There should be no excuse for someone on your crew not to be carrying the TIC. Just like your radios, flashlights, or halligan bar, your TIC is an extremely useful and critical tool—if you remember to carry it with you!

A TIC can be used for the following: search and rescue, electrical emergencies, wildland firefighting, safety officer, explosions, scene assessment, overhaul, motor vehicle incidents, fire attack, aircraft emergencies, size-up, law enforcement, hazmat, ventilation, water rescue, line placement, confined space, rehabilitation, overheated machinery, training, accountability, EMS, incident command, building construction, fire/arson investigations, RIT, fire prevention, and aerial operations.

If you are in doubt about using a TIC, my best advice is to just start using it. The more you use it, the more proficient you will become. For example, use your TIC during fire prevention inspections for electrical panels, overheated breakers, buried electrical cords, and so on. Also, think about using your TIC for EMS calls, including patient assessment for frostbite, hypothermia, water rescue, and mass casualty triage such as a bus incident or determining how many occupants were in a vehicle rollover.

Training instructors monitoring the safety of their students and even recording the event for a later playback are a perfect example of where your TIC can be used. Think about using your TIC for overheated machinery incidents, which may include motors, bearings, and conveyors. How many times have you received a call about a missing person or your local police department has reached out to you for help when searching for a young child who is lost or an Alzheimer’s patient who has wandered away from his home? A TIC is your greatest tool for search and rescue calls. Here’s another scenario that most firefighters don’t think about: Take your TIC up into the basket of the aerial to see what you are doing through the thick, smoky conditions while also

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Posted: May 1, 2019
Categories: Fire Mechanics
Comments: 0
 
keeping it safe | Robert Tutterow
 

The 2019 FDSOA Apparatus Specifications & Maintenance Symposium was once again a highly informative event to learn about the latest features, products, and changes in the fire apparatus industry.

Robert Tutterow

One of the key presentations was an update on the proposed changes to National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 1901, Standard for Automotive Fire Apparatus. Several members of the audience were dumbfounded when they learned that one of the proposed changes was to allow fire departments to choose their own colors for the chevron striping on the back of apparatus.

Sadly, this is an initiative driven by the fire service, hopefully a vocal minority. Why would the manufacturers care? They would prefer to carry fewer colors in their inventory and not have to invest time in customizing each striping requirement, a cost that is not absorbed but passed on to the customer. The current requirements for chevron striping state, “Each stripe in the chevron shall be a single color alternating between red and either yellow, fluorescent yellow, or fluorescent yellow-green.”

What was the reason for the chevron requirement that became part of the standard 10 years ago? Safety for the firefighters working at the scene and to minimize the risk of the apparatus being struck from the rear. Has this requirement worked? There is no data system that captures such information, but there is plenty of history that shows it does. The European fire service has decades of history, not just one decade like in the United States. Obviously, the standard does not guarantee a firefighter or fire apparatus will not be struck, but it reduces the probability and indicates the fire department’s commitment to safety.

Ten years ago, roadway safety was becoming a big issue, and the forward thinkers realized that fire apparatus need to be as visible as possible. On reflection, those forward thinkers were absolutely correct about the dangers of operating on roadways, and their approach was sound. They realized that visibility is not just for nighttime but for daylight, dawn, and dusk. A key selling point on the idea was a photo taken from an overpass of a Plano (TX) Fire Department rig at a multilane incident several hundred feet away. It was a bright, sunny day, and the rigs were most conspicuous because of the fluorescent yellow and red chevrons.

Moreover, the forward thinkers were aware of the Manual for Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD). This manual contains a section on temporary traffic control (TTC). Although the MUTCD does not prescribe specific requirements for fire apparatus, it states: “Traffic control devices shall be defined as all signs, signals, markings, and other devices used to regulate, warn, or guide road users, placed on, over, or adjacent to a street, highway, private roads open to public travel.”

“The basic safety principles governing the design of permanent roadways and roadsides should also govern the design of TTC zones. The goal should be to route road users through such zones using

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Posted: May 1, 2019
Categories: Fire Mechanics
Comments: 0
 

delivery of the month

Ferrara—Fort Branch/Union Township (IN) Fire Department pumper. Cinder cab and chassis; Cummins ISL9 450-hp engine; Waterous CSU 1,750-gpm pump; 750-gallon polypropylene tank; Whelen scene lights. Dealer: Jarrod Brown, Mid America Fire & Safety, Evansville, IN.

Ferrara—Fort Branch/Union Township (IN) Fire Department pumper. Cinder cab and chassis; Cummins ISL9 450-hp engine; Waterous CSU 1,750-gpm pump; 750-gallon polypropylene tank; Whelen scene lights. Dealer: Jarrod Brown, Mid America Fire & Safety, Evansville, IN.

 

Pierce—Central Stickney Fire Protection District, Stickney Township, IL. 107-foot Ascendant PUC quint. Enforcer cab and chassis; Cummins L9 450-hp engine; Pierce 1,500-gpm single-stage pump; UPF Poly 500-gallon tank; Harrison 8-kW generator. Dealer: Vince Baudek, Global Emergency Products, Aurora, IL.

Pierce—Central Stickney Fire Protection District, Stickney Township, IL. 107-foot Ascendant PUC quint. Enforcer cab and chassis; Cummins L9 450-hp engine; Pierce 1,500-gpm single-stage pump; UPF Poly 500-gallon tank; Harrison 8-kW generator. Dealer: Vince Baudek, Global Emergency Products, Aurora, IL.

 

Rosenbauer—Jefferson City (MO) Fire Department 101-foot Cobra platform quint. Commander 6508 cab and chassis; Cummins ISX15 600-hp engine; Waterous S100 1,750-gpm pump; Pro Poly 500-gallon polypropylene tank. Dealer: Brian Franz, Sentinel Emergency Solutions, Arnold, MO.

Rosenbauer—Jefferson City (MO) Fire Department 101-foot Cobra platform quint. Commander 6508 cab and chassis; Cummins ISX15 600-hp engine; Waterous S100 1,750-gpm pump; Pro Poly 500-gallon polypropylene tank. Dealer: Brian Franz, Sentinel Emergency Solutions, Arnold, MO.

 

E-ONE—Yeagertown (PA) Fire Company air and light unit. International 4400 cab and chassis; Cummins L9 350-hp engine; 18-foot combination walk-in/walk-around rescue body length; Will-Burt Night Scan Chief NS2.3-600-watt Whelen LED lightheads; four-bottle 6,000-psi cascade system; Bauer 6,000PSI BP13H-E3 compressor with Auto Fill; 2 SpaceSaver M2792 2-bottle fill stations. Dealer: Mike Jamison, Fire Line Equipment, New Holland, PA.

E-ONE—Yeagertown (PA) Fire Company air and light unit. International 4400 cab and chassis; Cummins L

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Posted: Apr 30, 2019
Categories: Fire Mechanics
Comments: 0

The Santa Fe Fire Department, like many across the state, is becoming overwhelmed with medical calls. Now, they've created a new division with the hopes of better serving citizens. 

Read more krqe.com

SFFD responds to all sorts of events like structure fires, hazmat situations, swift water rescues and more, but a big portion of the thousands of calls they get each year are medical emergencies. While the department has served the community with emergency medical services for 40 years, a new division of the department will now focus on this and community outreach. "This will be a new effort for us," said Greg Cliburn, Assistant Chief of EMS for the Santa Fe Fire Department.

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Posted: Apr 30, 2019
Categories: Fire Mechanics
Comments: 0
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Posted: Apr 30, 2019
Categories: Fire Mechanics
Comments: 0

SFFD responds to all sorts of events like structure fires, hazmat situations, swift water rescues and more, but a big portion of the thousands of calls they get each year are medical emergencies.  

While the department has served the community with emergency medical services for 40 years, a new division of the department will now focus on this and community outreach.

"This will be a new effort for us," said Greg Cliburn, Assistant Chief of EMS for the Santa Fe Fire Department.

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Posted: Apr 30, 2019
Categories: Fire Mechanics
Comments: 0

The Corning Fire Department welcomed a new engine last week, as the city’s latest truck rolled into the station.

Read more www.redbluffdailynews.com

In December of 2017, Fire Chief Tom Tomlinson and members of his crew began the process of designing the new engine, which was manufactured by Pierce, a company out of Florida. Tomlinson visited the shop in Florida in April of 2018 to pick specifications and work with the company’s designers to make the city’s vision a reality.

From that point, the truck was taken to Sacramento to have all the additional parts installed, including hoses and nozzles.

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Posted: Apr 30, 2019
Categories: Fire Mechanics
Comments: 0
 
 

The fire station will serve as home to crews, with a permanent station to be completed within four years on Reams Road, south of Summerlake Park Boulevard. Orange County Mayor Jerry L. Demings was joined by District 1 County Commissioner Betsy VanderLey and dignitaries for the ceremonial ribbon cutting. Due to rapid growth in the area, the station was implemented to address the immediate needs of the community.

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Posted: Apr 30, 2019
Categories: Fire Mechanics
Comments: 0
 
 

The 8th Utilities District is a special taxing district that provides fire and sanitary sewer services to the northern third of town.

Fire Chief Daniel Langer said that the new Engine 1 will be posted at the department’s Station 3, which is across from BJ’s Wholesale Club on Tolland Turnpike.  

The new engine, a Saber model from Florida-based Pierce manufacturing, arrived in Connecticut at the end of March. The new Engine 1 cost $458,650. In comparison, he said, it cost the department about $680,000 to buy a custom-built engine three years ago.

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Posted: Apr 30, 2019
Categories: Fire Mechanics
Comments: 0
 
 

Fortuna Volunteer Fire Department personnel worked closely with Pierce, the manufacturer of the new fire truck, to fit the truck to the needs of Fortuna and the Eel River Valley. It includes many modern safety upgrades and new communications equipment.  

As the new fire truck was welcomed into the Fortuna Volunteer Fire Department fleet, an older truck was being retired and has been donated to Santa Rosa Junior College.

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FIRE ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT SECTION UPCOMING EVENTS

Upcoming Events

FIRE ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT BOARD & COMMITTEES

Chair

Posted: Sep 21, 2019

Chair

Mykel Montgomery

Franklin County 3
Administrative Assistant

mmontgomery@fcfd3.org

509-547-9306 

 

Term; 2019 - 2020

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Vice Chair

Posted: Sep 18, 2019

Vice Chair

Caity Karapostoles

Clallam County Fire District 3

caityk@ccfd3.org

360-683-4242


Term: 2019 - 2021

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Treasurer

Posted: Sep 21, 2015

Treasurer

Emily Lewis

Eastside Fire & Rescue

elewis@esf-r.org

425-313-3200 x 1200


Term: 2019 - 2021

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Secretary

Posted: Sep 21, 2015

Secretary

Cindy Buchan

KC Fire Chiefs Training Division

cindy@fftraining.org

425-255-1241


Term: 2018 - 2020

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Communications

Posted: Sep 21, 2015

Communications

Lisette Kelly

Mountain View Fire & Rescue
Administrative Assistant

253-735-0284 


Term: 2019 - 2021

 

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Regional Representative

Posted: Sep 21, 2015

Regional Representative

Cathy Blakeway

City of Tumwater Fire Department
Administrative Assistant

cblakeway@ci.tumwater.wa.us

360-754-4170

 

Term: 2019 - 2021

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Regional Representative

Posted: Sep 21, 2015

Regional Representative

Kristen Cole

Walla Walla County Fire District 5

kcole@wwcfd5.org 

509-547-8341


Term: 2018 - 2020

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Regional Representative

Posted: Sep 21, 2015

Regional Representative

Julie Patterson

Vancouver Fire Department

 julie.patterson@cityofvancouver.us

360-487-7224


Term: 2019 - 2021

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Regional Representative

Posted: Sep 21, 2015

Regional Representative

Kim Baldwin

Clark County Fire District 10

kim.baldwin@clark.wa.gov

360-247-5233


Term: 2019 - 2021


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Committee Member

Posted: Sep 21, 2015

Committee Member

Katie Rassmussen

Washington State Fire Training Academy

Division Public Information Officer & Event Coordinator 2

Katie.Rasmussen@wsp.wa.gov

425-453-3000 x 110 


 

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Committee Member

Posted: Sep 21, 2015

Committee Member

Lori Coleman

Clallam County Fire District 3

lcoleman@ccfd3.org

360-582-2054

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Committee Member

Posted: Sep 21, 2015

Committee Member

Patty Kramlich

Mountain View Fire and Rescue
pkramlich@mvfire.org 

253-735-0284

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Committee Member

Posted: Sep 21, 2015

Committee Member

Lauren Lucas

Kittitas County Fire District 1

Lauren.Lucas@fairpoint.net

509-964-2435
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Committee Member

Posted: Sep 20, 2015

Committee Member

Tami Petterson

City of Tumwater Fire Department

tpetterson@ci.tumwater.wa.us 

360-754-4170

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Committee Member

Posted: Sep 19, 2015

Committee Member

Melissa Knutson

Eastside Fire & Rescue

mknutson@esf-r.org

425-313-3232

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Committee Member

Posted: Sep 18, 2015

Committee Member

Tina Williamson

Puget Sound Regional Fire Authority

tmwilliamson@pugetsoundfire.org

253-856-4406


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Committee Member

Posted: Sep 17, 2015

Committee Member

Linda Reeff

Puget Sound Regional Fire Authority

lreeff@pugetsoundfire.org

253-856-4334 
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Committee Member

Posted: Sep 16, 2015

Committee Member

Christel Nelson

Vancouver Fire Department

christel.nelson@cityofvancouver.us

360-487-7223

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Committee Member

Posted: Sep 15, 2015

Committee Member

Tasiya Deering

Moses Lake Fire Department

tdeering@cityofml.com

509-764-3848


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Committee Member

Posted: Sep 14, 2015

Committee Member

Jamie Formisano

Eastside Fire & Rescue

jformisano@esf-r.org

425-313-3228

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